TEYCSTW #5 – Citizens on patrol

Morning campers…

… he says, taking a guess at both the time you read this AND your preferred leisure activity.

It’s Sunday, so it’s time for issue #5 of TEYCSTW.

Let’s get straight to it…

… after this 15 minute hard sell for my new course, “HOW TO EXAMINE YOUR OWN PROSTATE – using only three dental mirrors, one well-lubricated broom handle and four weeks of intense stretching”…

1. “WASN’T HE IN S CLUB 7?”

Every industry has its celebrities. They’re probably not world-famous, like the Kardashians, Ruth Madoc or Gillian Taylforth…

… but people in your world would definitely recognise their name.

If you’re looking for some good email fodder, choose a celebrity in your niche and analyse them.

You don’t have to go full “Sigmund” on this (so you can cancel the leather Chaisse Long from IKEA)

Just spend some time writing about WHY you think they shot to fame. What is it about their ideas, thoughts, beliefs, programs or personality that connects with people?

What made them become the celebrity they are? Was there a specific point they shot to fame? Why?

Is there something underneath it all that your audience may not be able to appreciate?

Write about why you respect them or not, but don’t be a tool about it.

You can tell a lot about a person by how they talk about other people.

Save the “WHY IS HE FAMOUS??? IT SHOULD BE MEEEEEEEEE!” for your next journaling session.

2. “TAE-BO? I THOUGHT WE WERE HAVING INDIAN TONIGHT?”

Crazes. Fads. Obsessions. Trends.

There are probably other synonyms.

Every market has it’s whims.

Sure, some audiences are more prone to it than others, but even the blandest and boringest markets will have moments when everybody can’t seem to get enough of one particular thing.

(Who else remembers the great “cyan wall plug” craze of 2005 – crazy!)

Pick a fad and write about it in an email.

If there’s a fad in your market at the moment, great – talk about that.

If not, put your reminiscing hat on and choose one from days gone by.

Fads serve as good metaphors – they give you a lot of life lessons, the most obvious one of which being that, while you might feel the overwhelming pressure to keep up in the moment, over the long haul, it doesn’t matter.

The underlying principles remain the same…

It doesn’t matter how you lose weight or sweat yourself silly, the point is that you do.

It doesn’t matter if you meditate using this app or these headphones, the point is that you do.

Etc… etc…

Even if you can’t find a fad in your industry, write a story of any fad you’ve experienced and link it to your audience/market/product.

3. QUITTIN’ TIME!

Learning new stuff is hard.

The idea of “adding” stuff, whether it’s skills, apps or things to do is pretty tiring for most people…

… which is handy because the biggest gains are often found in the stuff you GIVE UP – the things you STOP doing.

Let’s make your audience’s life a little easier this week, shall we?

Let’s give them a list of things they should give up to get closer to their big, fat, hairy and, quite possibly, audacious goal.

Have a brainstorm before you write anything. Try to come up with a HUGE list.

Oh, and make sure they vary in difficulty too.

We want your readers to feel good and excited when reading your email, remember? If every item is the equivalent of giving up heroin or climbing Kilimanjaro…

(or, worse, giving up heroin WHILE climbing Kilimanjaro)

… they’re just going to delete it.

Give them stuff that challenges them a little, sure, but fill at least half the list with easy stuff.

As for the number of things… go nuts.

As I said, have a good brainstorm about this and don’t be afraid to throw too much at them. As long as you make each item clear, actionable and powerful on its own, you can’t have too many.

If you manage to come up with 101 different things, fine.

You can always suggest they save the email, or copy it into a Word doc so they can come back to it.

Ooooh! – you could also maybe put it all into a PDF and pop it in your own GOOGLE DRIVE OF AWESOMENESS!!!!

(Don’t you dare call it that! I’ve watched over seven episodes of Ally McBeal and I WILL sue!)

Make the email simple – one or two lines per item.

Write down the thing they need to give up and tell them WHY. 

What’s the benefit they will experience?

How will this make their life better? 

That’s it.

Have a great Sunday and, as ever, do let me know if you plan on sending any of these, as I’d love to know how you get on.

See you back here tomorrow,

John